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   Old Thread  #18 10 Apr 2021 at 7.42am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #17
My favourite waters would be dyje 5, Lehman, lipno, Ballaton and the amazing Mara. All 2000 acres plus

And all you need is one fish to show itself, open up the outboard and get on it




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   Old Thread  #17 10 Apr 2021 at 2.58am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
Hi James
Ok, I'll give this a go,
My favourite waters would be dyje 5, Lehman, lipno, Ballaton and the amazing Mara. All 2000 acres plus
Get a boat with sonar, understanding the underwater topography is a huge advantage.
Do not pay any attention to previous captures, in my opinion there are two types of carp on these lakes. The "homey lonely" fish that tend to hang out in one particular area and generally are the ones that get a name. There are large schools of unknown nomadic fish that are the real prize
Braid.... quite frankly it's just a must
Leads, for me the greater the distance the more weight the better, but its worth paying attention to the type of lead. Imo a gripper lead holds it's own better than a lead twice it's size.
Bait, I got brutalized on here a couple of years ago for suggesting 200 kilos of particle for a week on sumbar, the guy apparently had his best 2 weeks ever.
I'm aware I may pissed of a few with this, but knowledge is value
Hope it helps
Best
Jon
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   Old Thread  #16 8 Apr 2021 at 8.14pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
One of my waters is about an acre, another one is about sixty acres. But a lot of peoples standards they’d say that sixty acres isn’t that big, but it feels bit enough for me!

What I’ve found is that they can actually be a lot trickier to locate on the small water at times. I’m sure they know when anglers are about. Where as on the big water even I have managed to find them. That might not seem like it matters much, but I have poor colour vision, red green, black brown. So a brown fish in green water is invisible to me unless it’s moving, so disturbing water or causing bubbles or moving reeds etc. If it’s stationary or moving far enough under the surface or the water I’d coloured then it’s pretty much game over for me.

So you’d think I’d find a big water much more daunting but in actual fact I don’t think anglers spook them as much. There’s way more “safe” areas, more bank cover, more snags, more area of water at range. So they are less spooky and give themselves away more.

My best mates take it for granted now. When we walk a water I’ve lost count of the amount of conversations that start “you won’t be able to see this you blind c@@t but there’s three fish out there”

I also can’t really see marker floats. So I don’t really use one anymore.

Great lark this carp angling
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   Old Thread  #15 8 Apr 2021 at 3.30pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1

Lots of great advice already posted

Off course, location is key - if its possible to locate them…


Some more ideas:
- Find the areas with mussels or other favorite feeding spots.
- Explore the wind.
- Depths and temperature. Ex. Big deep waters are not that big if you concentrate on areas with less than 1.5-2 meters of depth in spring etc.
- Prebait obvious areas, selective high visual baits, where you can return and watch if the baits are eaten, sight is key here.
- Move around, fish for one bite at a time, a bag and handfull of freebees. When you get a bite, log the circumstances, look for patterns.
- In my experience - and I was surprised getting it - I’ve caught quite a lot in the margin or a rod length out.

Learn to enjoy not catching much - but keep working - crack the puzzle - it can go from 1 catch a season to a suddenly haul… Been there…
Visit a runs water now and then, keeps the self-esteem healthy…

Good Luck
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   Old Thread  #14 8 Apr 2021 at 10.17am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
You've got to find them, it's no different to any other situation, find some fish, fish well and your in with a chance.

Then build up the experiences of fishing and how the lake/fish react to weather, areas they like and you'll be in with more of a chance.

Get a bit of bait going in on those areas....
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   Old Thread  #13 7 Apr 2021 at 2.10pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #12
Nah, it goes something like this

Size, fish stock, topography, angling pressure.
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   Old Thread  #12 7 Apr 2021 at 1.09pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
The first question is what your definition of "big" is and the second question is how deep the lake is, because all those comments about walking around and observing can go out the window when the lake is too big to walk around or too windy/murky on average to properly spot fish. Also, in deeper pits I've noticed fish don't always jump or show themselves, which can be problematic.

Most important thing is to put in the effort and keep doing so. Try to be there as often as possible, also without rods, and especially during those days when you know you're in with a good chance of learning something new. I have learned a lot right before and during spawning, on days with clear water and/or no wind and by being awake at crazy hours.

Another big advantage is the use of a boat in combination with depth finder and an aquascope and prodding stick. Frequently bait likely areas and check whether or not they have been emptied. Logging that information will put you at a big advantage in years to come. It can take a long time to find your way but as others have said, as soon as you know where to find them, they're not that difficult to catch.
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   Old Thread  #11 6 Apr 2021 at 2.29pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #2
Nailed it. I've been fishing big pits for years (300 acres +)..Break the lake down mate, turn it into 20 lakes and then fish each portion as you would do a lake of that size. Get your gear strong and all your tools up to the job - when the wind blows on those pits, 20mph feels like 40mph as it races across the sheet of water. A lot of anglers fall at the first hurdle as their gear isn't fit for purpose.

Get on your toes - follow the winds, big pit carp react to weather. You have to locate them and make notes on weather conditions e,t,c,....they are creatures of habit on those big pits.

Be lucky, big pit angling along with the rivers is the last real bastion of our pastime.
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   Old Thread  #10 6 Apr 2021 at 11.25am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
. . .location - and bait, lots of it.

Biggest water I've ever fished took 2hrs to walk around (small by some standards) . . . the fish moved in shoals (much like the bream) and by constantly pre-baiting 3-4 swims within comfortable fishing range and on a regular basis paid dividends. Once they moved in as others have inferred they were relatively easy to catch and multiple hits became the norm . . . .much more so than some of the much smaller, spotty, moody waters I've fished!
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   Old Thread  #9 6 Apr 2021 at 10.35am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #3
I agree Phil.
The hardest part about big waters is finding them. Once you've done that (which is more time consuming than it is difficult) they're generally suckers for a pop up. Much easier to catch than small water carp imo, assuming distance doesn't become a problem.
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   Old Thread  #8 6 Apr 2021 at 8.07am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
My other thing to add is in my experience, winds play much more of a factor on a big pit than they do on smaller waters too
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   Old Thread  #7 6 Apr 2021 at 2.23am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
Remember that all of the basics that work for you usually are still a good starting point. Rigs, hooks, bait etc.

Weather conditions - watch the water when the sun is out to see where the fish roam while up in the water.

You can't fish the whole lake at once so use all your smaller water knowledge on the swim you have

And even the biggest lake has margins.... too often ignored, especially early summer evenings.
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   Old Thread  #6 6 Apr 2021 at 1.00am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
I fish, In the US but the concept probably still works, Waters of up to 20,000+ acres. I suspect that may be big enough?😁

A number of factors drive finding fish.

1. Seasonality, they often move miles to the prespawn areas, invariably in shallower water/creeks/shallows etc.

2. Post spawn, generally the carp move to summer quarters, I always seek structure, drop offs from bankside points etc. if you cant get afloat, a lot of marker/Deeper work will expose these.

3. Depending on stock density, a lot of Bait will be needed to delay patrolling fish long enough to get a bite.
Alternatively, with low stock/big fish, a bite at a time approach can work, little piles of bait.

Obviously if they show a lot location gets easier fast. (Ours tend not to...)

Basically, find an area you think they will be in and treat it like a small, water, as others have said.
Good luck, big lakes have that mystery about them....
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   Old Thread  #5 5 Apr 2021 at 11.32pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
Depends on what you call a big water.
On one of the Walthamstow ressies, I'd more or less bank on a bite from one of them every session.
Another of the smaller ressies, not so.

Spend as much time as you can weeks in advance walking and watching.
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   Old Thread  #4 5 Apr 2021 at 11.31pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
Personally I would Invest in good quality walking boots and decent comfy socks, you will need them.
Walk, look, listen, as much as possible, even when not fishing, if you are fairly local, and get a good pair of binoculars.
Travel light, Good strong simple rigs, and any decent bait you have confidence in.
Stick at it, success won't be instant, unless you are lucky, and be prepared to move, as the fish will flit about with changing weather conditions and/or angling pressure.
Got to stay on them, with them as much as possible, location is everything.

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