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   Underfloor heating (Electric)
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   Old Thread  #16 19 Oct 2020 at 6.57pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
I installed a 150 watt mating system in my bathroom and itís brilliant, got a lifetime guarantee on the heating element, I did put 2 thermostats in but only wired one up, if that packs up thereís the other to fall back on, itís surprising how nicely it warms the bathroom up,
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   Old Thread  #15 19 Oct 2020 at 3.36pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #13
No sorry we currently have porcelain tiles in the kitchen/dinner at the moment which makes the floor very cold, we are going to refit Karndean.
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   Old Thread  #14 19 Oct 2020 at 9.56am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
Hi,

For a wooden fIoor you can use any electric cable type underfloor heating so long as the cables are encased within the latex / screed.

Where is it not suitable to raise the floor height we supply a pre manufactured carbon under floor heat mat .. basically like a huge mat you may use in a vivarium.

If your still unsure call a company called 'Varme' ask for Andrew and tell him you'v been recommended by 'Dave at Elliotts'
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   Old Thread  #13 19 Oct 2020 at 6.47am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #12
So your swapping marble effect karndean for wood effect with a thermal underlay?

The only underlay I've seen for lvt click floors is around 1mm thick, surprisingly it does make a difference but not a huge one, a cold floor will still be cold. Because the vinyl is so thin it doesn't cope with a layer that can compress which rules out using a decent thermal underlay. Underfloor heating really is the only answer I think.

I haven't done one in 18months so I could be out of date, but I have ripped a few out this year to change to underfloor heating and porcelain tiles
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   Old Thread  #12 18 Oct 2020 at 10.08pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
Thanks for all the replyís, Iím currently looking into digging the floor down too accommodate the wet system.

We currently have marble effect flooring which makes the floor very cold in the mornings and evenings, Iím hoping just moving over to wood with a insulation above the latex will take the cold off it.
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   Old Thread  #11 17 Oct 2020 at 8.47am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #10
Hi Ian, thanks for that but i should have pointed out that in my brothers case he installed wet systems in large kitchen diners, he has also installed the electric systems in the smaller bathrooms like mine, i sort of knew about how the heating element of the electric system works in principle and of course as you say it is designed to give off heat without it being over compromised as is the case with a surge on a fuse which is designed to blow in that event
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   Old Thread  #10 16 Oct 2020 at 10.29pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #9
Hi Henry
Hopefully it wonít act like a fuse as they are designed to work in different ways. However a fuse and your underfloor do use the same principle in that any length of wire has a resistance and heats up as a current is passed through it.

A fuse is a short length of wire with a low resistance that doesnít significantly limit the current until it reaches its melting point and ďblowsĒ when too much current is passed through it.
A heating element such as in your cooker, electric fire or underfloor element is a long length of wire and has a high resistance that limits the current when a set voltage ( mains in your case) is applied. It should then give out heat but always stay below a safe temperature.
Not sure if thatís made it any clearer but you did ask. 🙂

Your size underfloor is an ideal candidate for electric, low installation and running cost, so the saving on running cost might not recoup the extra cost of a wet system.
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   Old Thread  #9 16 Oct 2020 at 9.04pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #8
Am i right in saying that electric underfloor heating is basically like a giant fuse? Well i was told that anyway and it makes sense, ive got it in my bathroom which is only 3 sq mtrs and i only use it when i get home from work to shower, it heats up incrementally on a timer throughout the day, if it ever went wrong like a break in the circuit its not too bad only having to retile a small area but an area the size you mention is a lot, thats if it ever went wrong of course, mines been fine since it was installed in 2013
My brothers has installed wet systems in both of his daughters houses that run off the boiler with pumps, not too sure of the specifics but once its set in its one continuous length of pipework so that part of the system should never need touching again
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   Old Thread  #8 16 Oct 2020 at 6.29pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #7
An existing boiler probably would cope as it would be sized for heating the whole house anyway.
The radiators would be replaced (or put on standby )by the underfloor so the total usage would be similar.
A wet system powered by gas or oil would save approximately £900 pa over electric heating for 60 square metres. That figure will of course vary with insulation values, temperatures etc but its based on uk averages.
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   Old Thread  #7 16 Oct 2020 at 9.08am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #4
That's a big area for an electric system, I don't really see them in areas bigger than a bathroom. It's worth looking at Ralph's suggestion. The wet systems are often more expensive to buy and install, may need a bigger boiler so it would take years for the wet system to pay for itself over electric, on the other hand wet will have a longer lifespan and isn't as fragile should you replace the karndean in 10 yrs
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   Old Thread  #6 16 Oct 2020 at 6.44am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #4
You could be looking at a 5 or 6 KW system which will increase your electric bill somewhat.
Unless you are just dumping excess PV generation into the system, electric is a very expensive way to heat.
Off peak would help if you have it but itís still 2 or 3 times the cost of heat from oil or gas.
Not sure if lower power pads are available just to warm the floor slightly and still use your existing system but
as Ralph says have a look, it could save you a large chunk of money per year.




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   Old Thread  #5 16 Oct 2020 at 5.48am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #4
Hi mate , have a look at overlay underfloor heating , it will only raise the level of you're existing floor by 18 mm
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   Old Thread  #4 16 Oct 2020 at 3.06am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #3
It was a choice but I donít really want too dig the existing concrete floor up too be honest, I need around 60m2 with the kitchen/dining room.
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   Old Thread  #3 15 Oct 2020 at 8.08pm Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
Have you considered a wet system.Obviously I donít know the details of your existing heating, availability of off peak electricity, existing boiler and fuel etc but normally a wet system is cheaper to run and gives a pay back over electric long term.
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   Old Thread  #2 13 Oct 2020 at 11.34am Login so you can post / reply  Register so you can join in!
In reply to Post #1
sales@livingheat.co.uk

Or give Living heat a call. Had my underfloor heating etc from there and very knowledgeable too.

Edit - Insulation boards too to assist in getting temperature up quicker.
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